What is a Traffic Assignment Letter (TAL)?

What is Comscore?

Comscore is a company that tracks how people use the internet. Similar to how there are "TV ratings" that track how many people watch a TV show, Comscore tracks how many and what kind of people visit different sites. Advertisers use Comscore ratings to figure out which sites they want to advertise on to reach their goals.

What is a Traffic Assignment Letter (TAL)?

A Traffic Assignment Letter (TAL) tells Comscore that the traffic they're tracking on your site can also be included into the AdThrive group of bloggers. Because advertisers typically don't buy ads from individual sites, when you join a group like AdThrive, it makes your site more visible to them. The more they see your awesome traffic, the more they're willing to pay for it.

How do fill out a Comscore form?

You likely filled out your form right before having your AdThrive ads installed, but if you're unsure feel free to reach out to our team to find out.

Does assigning my TAL to AdThrive keep me from getting credit for my traffic?

No! (This is a common confusion.) When you assign your traffic in Comscore, you still retain all the rights to your own data. Assigning the TAL to AdThrive allows us to include you in negotiations with potential advertisers. Realistically, only the very largest sites on the web are big enough to get that kind of individual attention from advertisers, which why it benefits you to assign your TAL to a group that can help you get exposure with advertisers.

Who should not fill out a TAL?

If you're under contract to have your traffic assigned to another network for a period of time, we don't want to encourage you to break your contract. However, your contract, as well as current traffic assignment, may be hurting your ability to earn in the long run. If you're with one of the few networks who require this, drop us a note and we'll be happy to analyze your income and see if you'd make more money overall by switching away from that network when your contract ends.

Ultimately, you should be selfish with your TAL. You should assign it to the network that can make you the most difference in your blog income. If it's currently assigned to a network that's only running in one ad space on your site, or that isn't making you much money, then you might be better served (and make more money) by sending it elsewhere.

Can I assign my traffic to multiple places?

No. Your traffic can only be assigned to one company at a time. When you assign your traffic to a company for the first time, it's like you're walking into a big room full of tables. You go sit down at the table of the group where you've assigned your traffic. When you assign your traffic to AdThrive, you go sit at the AdThrive table. This lets advertisers know that your ads are backed by the AdThrive reputation for quality as part of the group at AdThrive table. If you then assign your traffic to a different company, it's as if you've stood up and moved to a different table and sat down there. You can't sit at two tables at once: you must sit at the table where your traffic is assigned.

What does the TAL allow AdThrive to do for me?

This allows AdThrive to sell your ads as part of a group to bigger advertisers and package your site with the other high-quality blogs in our network. We can use our relationship with advertisers to help them find your site when they might not have noticed it on its own. When they see the quality of your site, they understand the value and are willing to pay more money.

Bigger advertisers love the quality of audiences that AdThrive sites have. The problem from their perspective is that they can't deal with a lot of different sites, and it's hard for them to know the value of one blog. If they want to reach hundreds of millions of people, they like to be able to just go to one place to reach those people. Together, the AdThrive group will ensure that your site, as well as every site in the AdThrive community, is easily accessible and valued among advertisers!

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